Stuff I make...

1951 Ford

Baron Of Butt Welds
Supporter
Yes 1 5/8". Those are all galvanized correct? Think they would be heavy enough?
Yes on the galvanized. If you used short pieces, I think they'd be heavy enough.

I don't know anything about the galvanized fencing stuff, I've never really been around it... but the closest pipe you can fit will be 1", which has a 1.315" OD. Pretty sloppy. If it can be solid, 1-1/2" solid round is really common, and that would make it pretty stout as well.
If it's an option, solid is a better choice, like @CharlieK alluded to.
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
I could drill 3.5 holes in the amount of time it took to cut one plate.View attachment 66264View attachment 66265
Ha! The first thing through my mind when you mentioned the size of holes, was... "oh, no! That's going to be a time consuming pain in the.... " but then I saw the mag drill and annular cutter, and it changed to... "whew! Thank God! " Those annular cutters work damn good, eh?
 

1951 Ford

Baron Of Butt Welds
Supporter
Ha! The first thing through my mind when you mentioned the size of holes, was... "oh, no! That's going to be a time consuming pain in the.... " but then I saw the mag drill and annular cutter, and it changed to... "whew! Thank God! " Those annular cutters work damn good, eh?
They work awesome!!! I used to drill all my holes with twist bits, including the 1-1/16" holes. For the cost of 2 of the big twist drills, I can buy a cutter that will long outlast them. I've got a 5 gallon bucket full of slugs that work great to plug the ends of round hand rail tubing.
 

1951 Ford

Baron Of Butt Welds
Supporter
@1951 Ford what pitch blade are you using in the saw? I wouldn't have expected it to cut that fast...
I usually order in 8/12 or 10/14 bi-metal blades. That saw does a pretty good job of getting through material about that size. I cut a lot of 1/4" material for mounting plates with it as well. I have an alligator type shear, but it tends to bend the backside piece due to the way it cuts.
 

1951 Ford

Baron Of Butt Welds
Supporter
I also keep the saw blade sprayed with pb blaster to keep it lubricated. I have thought about building a coolant setup for that saw. Just trying to work through the filtration issue. One idea was to create a vertical pipe trap with a screw on cap on the bottom and a baffle to help settle the saw shavings down to the bottom. The coolant would come in on one side of the baffle and the return line back to the pump would come out the other side. I'd put the return about 3/4 of the way to the top.
I'm probably making this way more complicated than it needs to be.
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
I also keep the saw blade sprayed with pb blaster to keep it lubricated. I have thought about building a coolant setup for that saw. Just trying to work through the filtration issue. One idea was to create a vertical pipe trap with a screw on cap on the bottom and a baffle to help settle the saw shavings down to the bottom. The coolant would come in on one side of the baffle and the return line back to the pump would come out the other side. I'd put the return about 3/4 of the way to the top.
I'm probably making this way more complicated than it needs to be.
That is pretty close to what my jet saw was like... at least the same principle. The coolant tank was about 4" deep, 6" wide, 12" long.... with a baffle in the center. The inlet to the tank is on top of one end. Coolant has to flow over the baffle to get to the pump. When the pump went to heck, I replaced it a couple of times with these...

Homak Parts Washer Pump 5.6 GPM, Model# RP885 | Northern Tool > Parts Washers&utm_campaign=Homak&utm_content=74456&&lid=92700045966096892&ds_s_kwgid=58700003119359962&ds_e_product_group_id=601336012068&ds_e_product_store_id=&ds_e_ad_type=pla&ds_s_inventory_feed_id=97700000001662305&gclid=Cj0KCQjwuJz3BRDTARIsAMg-HxVb-ikpK_sufcgTwhpEqg12Z1rX5TXworAUw_RZ0GzY5blwlSFhOe4aAhhgEALw_wcB
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
Oops! The link in the first part of that works...

That coolant 'style' is almost identical on my DoALL 912. The DoALL 4100 is completely different, but the 912 used to be a very common production saw.
 

BlackBart

Shorebilly
Supporter
I haven't watched this whole video. I've seen a cold cut saw vs chop saw video in the past, and searched this one. The first 30 seconds of this video shows the difference.

Diamond blades on that cold saw or somthin?

Figure it would hafta be harder then the steel....
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
Diamond blades on that cold saw or somthin?

Figure it would hafta be harder then the steel....
Nope, no diamonds! The blade is carbide, so it is significantly harder than 'most' steel that you would cut with it.

The reason I make sure they start the cut as gently as possible, is because of the carbide. Carbide can't take abuse, but it'll last a long time if you take care of it. The cutedge of a bandsaw blade is generally made of HSS, which is much softer than carbide, and run with coolant, at the correct speeds, even they will last a long time.
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
I've had this plasma table for several months now, and haven't had the time to get it up and running. I bought it used, and the fella that had it, had the table on legs with rollers to slide it in and out for loading and unloading. The rollers, or casters, didn't roll it very true, so he had guides on the inside of the table to keep it more centered.

I removed his casters and legs, and put a little track together, along with 8" V-rollers, so it does a much better job of self centering. Not perfect, but close enough for almost anything I do.

The stand, that the table is sitting on, is temporary. That'll get rebuilt eventually so it will rise and lower, to shuttle two tables back and forth...

Samson.jpg
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
Both of my CNC Plasma tables are made by the same company. The first one, is a 4' x 4'. The method of handling the cables is pretty lame, but because it's pretty simple, it keeps the cost down. Eventually, I'll change this one, like I'm doing with the other table.

PlasmaCamMess.jpg

Instead of the dangling cables, I'm changing the 5' x 10' table to cable carriers. Nothing to get tangled up while it's running. It's a pretty common and continuous problem on the small table. The torch is held onto the machine by a 'break-away' magnet, and when the cables get tangled, it'll dislodge the magnet. It's more of an irritant than a serious problem though, because it'll just wreck one part. With the bigger table, many times, it'll make the whole sheet worthless.

Wish I could just stop everything else going on, and just stay on this until it's done and in use!

SamsonGantry.jpg
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
@CharlieK Whatcha doin where ya need a setup like that? You doin a lotta steel work?
Yeah, my truck driving is just to haul around the stuff I make, and haul steel. I've got a little welding shop, and we make dumpsters and roll off boxes. This plasma table, 5 x 10, will get used as a 5 x 10 for a while, and hopefully soon, get 're-sized' to a 6 x 10. The point of it, is to be able to replace, and get rid of, my squaring shear. 10' x 3/8" capacity...
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
Well, I'll be... The bypass valve on the washer, has been wide open for a while, and the pump has been getting worse and worse, bumping off of it's pressure switch. Sprayers were hardly spraying... Had him start pulling out the sprinklers to see what was wrong with them. Filters were pretty plugged up! Hard to tell what it is for sure. Could be fibers from pants and gloves, from handling the steel... Or maybe it's the cottonwoods cotton that's been blowing around... Whatever it is, it's not enough to see it as your loading it, but it brought everything to a screeching halt for about 30 minutes!

It's washed somewhere north of 1,000 sheets. Part of me wants to see if I can put a removable plug in the bottom of the sprinklers, and when it starts acting up, remove the plug to blast everything out... But the right way is going to see what I can figure out for a high volume filter, that's fast to change out!

Filter.jpg
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
We had good luck with centrifugal filters for taking resist out of chemistry.

dropped it onto a 50 micron conveyor screen and dumped it into the waste water for the water treatment department to handle further.

they’d compression filter it down and make cake out of it for disposal as non-hazardous waste.
 

CharlieK

Un-Known Member
Supporter
We had good luck with centrifugal filters for taking resist out of chemistry.

dropped it onto a 50 micron conveyor screen and dumped it into the waste water for the water treatment department to handle further.

they’d compression filter it down and make cake out of it for disposal as non-hazardous waste.
Seems like you've mentioned the centrifugal filters in the past, but not sure what the context was...? I'm having problems visualizing how a centrifugal separator or filter would work when much of the items being filtered out, are lighter than the water they are in. Wouldn't happen to have a video or article about it would you?

If the lint or cotton, was heavier than the water, I know I could make a cyclone to spin it out... Not sure how to do that when it's lighter...
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Seems like you've mentioned the centrifugal filters in the past, but not sure what the context was...? I'm having problems visualizing how a centrifugal separator or filter would work when much of the items being filtered out, are lighter than the water they are in. Wouldn't happen to have a video or article about it would you?

If the lint or cotton, was heavier than the water, I know I could make a cyclone to spin it out... Not sure how to do that when it's lighter...
Nope, never mentioned them here before.

I guess the correct technical term for them are hydro cyclone filters.

the mesh conveyor would be at the bottom of the cyclone.

 
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