New To Trucking Neec help on a bet about the types of trucks a new driver will learn on or will be driving

I drive a manual 5 speed Kia Soul. I’m practicing double clutching and shifting. I am learning. Today I had a friend that told me while he was in school that you get to pick the color of the truck you wanted to drive an automatic if you wanted. I’m watching you tube videos and learning the trucks and all I am seeing is manual 10 speed up to 18. I am looking at him telling him no way that must be the simulator, or what ever but he swears to me no it’s true. I’m learning this and I can have automatic truck. I have a bet that he is being painted a pretty picture, so I am asking you all. Help to settle this so I can win $50 or loose $50.
 

Nomad1

Forum
Supporter
You can pick orange, red, black, white, blue, pewter, green, or maybe even yellow. Yes you can even pick an auto trans. But it's not exactly that easy.
 

Ontario Outlaw

Hozer Witta Hood
The trans in a Kia is a complete different trans than in a big rig.

Megas were pushing autos pretty hard the last few years, I hear some are going back to sticks.

You’ll probably get lumped with a 10 speed, auto or if you’re lucky a 13. Depends on what field you choose also. Van reefer container at a mega more chance of an auto, in my opinion. Most small fleets and specialized carriers will lean to sticks as they want better skilled drivers
 

Rigjockey

The Grand Poobah!
Supporter
I am hoping to find an auto shift truck, I know how to manual shift anyways, The double clutching on you tube looks hard, especially solo driving. If I tear up my transmission on my car hubby will kill me.
You don't wan't to learn on an auto, that limits your options for being hired. You don't want an auto after you have learned to shift your own gears.
Please don't try to double clutch on your car.
You will need to learn to double clutch but most of these drivers that have been out here a while just "float" gears. No clutch, just timing,
 

Electric Chicken

Well-Known Member
Supporter
A lot of states are branding licenses that were acquired in an automatic. It's a restriction like needing eyeglasses and such. The license restriction means driving a manual is unlawful. You are legally prohibited.

It'll limit job opportunities or at the very least, your usefulness and income in a fleet of mixed equipment, especially if your truck goes down and the only ones available are manual.

We have some drivers who can only drive automatics. They get sent home, without pay, if there aren't any available.

The rest of us can jump in anything and keep making money for both ourselves and the company.
 
It would be awesome to say Yeap I know how to drive a 13 speed and I drive a big rig and manual, diffently see the point in learning it. I can wait until I get to school. Can’t afford to put my car out of commission.
 

Joker11

Well-Known Member
Well, I am learning in a 13spd, and learning with no instruction. It isn’t hard to float, but I drive many types of vehicles.
 

Rigjockey

The Grand Poobah!
Supporter
Well, I am learning in a 13spd, and learning with no instruction. It isn’t hard to float, but I drive many types of vehicles.
13 is a nine speed and split the top gears, Not that hard, You can pre-select on the splitter.
Arguably one of the best transmissions to have on a 48 state running truck.:thumbsup:
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Others might want to jump in here on this speculation. But maybe an 18 speed might easier to learn to shift because the splits are about 300 rpm. Of course, that necessitates shifting quickly.
 

Rigjockey

The Grand Poobah!
Supporter
Others might want to jump in here on this speculation. But maybe an 18 speed might easier to learn to shift because the splits are about 300 rpm. Of course, that necessitates shifting quickly.
In deep reduction?
 

Doug Story

Member
You don't wan't to learn on an auto, that limits your options for being hired. You don't want an auto after you have learned to shift your own gears.
Please don't try to double clutch on your car.
You will need to learn to double clutch but most of these drivers that have been out here a while just "float" gears. No clutch, just timing,
Very true, once you learn to float the clutch, going back to using the clutch will be a pain in the A** (found that out the hard way when I took my road test to get my class A back in '14, I'd been floating the clutch for years in the B trucks I'd been driving, but the Virginia DMV wants testing to be double clutched.
 

Electric Chicken

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Very true, once you learn to float the clutch, going back to using the clutch will be a pain in the A** (found that out the hard way when I took my road test to get my class A back in '14, I'd been floating the clutch for years in the B trucks I'd been driving, but the Virginia DMV wants testing to be double clutched.
Yeah I couldn't even double clutch for Pumpkin in Chicago. It was too unnatural feeling and kinda wastes effort.

Fortunately even though I was nervous for the examiner (I hate being watched, no matter what I'm doing), I was smooth enough for him to not mind.

I think technically it was required but he overlooked it since I got the rest of the trip perfect, and didn't actually drop or grind any shifts.
 

BigRedFromTexas

Well-Known Member
I like an 18 over a 13 not because I need nearly so many splits but simply because I don't have to remember to make sure the splitter is in lo when hitting the lo range. Guess I'm just a princess like that.

:nails:
Are you the escapee? I've heard only stories about you. Today is my lucky day. :pickle:
 

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