Maybe Fageol Knows...

Electric Chicken

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Ps. Heaviest thing I tow with my Ram 3500 is 8200 lbs, had about 5000 lbs roughly in the box. My F150 is rated to tow over 10k lbs, but I don't remember the exact amount, but it feels a little squirrelly towing 8200, i tried it a few times. So instead I use the 3500 to tow it, handles fine.
My F150 (2015) sucked towing the enclosed trailer but the Ram 3500 didn't even know it was back there.

The Ford just isn't a very stable truck.
 
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Electric Chicken

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Big difference between a 150 and a 3500. That's not even a fair comparison. 1/2 ton over a 3 ton?
We're also talking about weights that these trucks are rated to handle. There's a lot more to it than just the weight. The shape of the trailer (aero) plays a huge role. The F150 I had was rated for 9200lbs. It could pull the same car on a flat trailer like it was nothing, but put it in a box and it's all over the road.

The stability of the dually (not just axles but beefier sway bars, drag links, trialing arms, steering stabilizer, etc) and longer wheelbase meant the enclosed trailer felt like a single unit with the truck. 70mph was a pinky finger affair with coffee in the other hand, not a white knuckle experience wondering if this is your day to die.

A 30k car hauler might not be so pinky fingered BUT without trying it first I wouldn't automatically assume it's too much.
 
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Electric Chicken

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By the same token, I can guarantee my Mack and old LTL both would handle a lot better with a flatbed than they do with these dry van cans. The air wouldn't rock around the cab and smack the gigantic front of the trailer. It would instead woosh through whatever is strapped on the deck.
 
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Canadian Eh

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My 8200 lb trailer is my travel trailer, full of propane, water, food, pots and pans, canoe on the roof, and such. I generally tow my boat with the F150, it is about 4,700 full of gas, trailer included. But its half the height of the travel trailer, which makes a lot of difference. The boat doesn't bother the F150 at all, and rides better than the 3500. Still rather drive my little car though.
 
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Electric Chicken

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My 8200 lb trailer is my travel trailer, full of propane, water, food, pots and pans, canoe on the roof, and such. I generally tow my boat with the F150, it is about 4,700 full of gas, trailer included. But its half the height of the travel trailer, which makes a lot of difference. The boat doesn't bother the F150 at all, and rides better than the 3500. Still rather drive my little car though.
Yeah we're beyond power being an issue these days and it's all in the aero.
 
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Canadian Eh

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AWD for slippery surfaces would be nice, my front wheel drive lacks traction sometimes. I do love dropping the backseats, and being able to fit a surprising amount of stuff in my honda hatchback. I'm used to, and enjoy the manual transmission in my car, but it is under powered, and under geared. Lacks strong enough AC for hot days, worst radio reception imaginable in a vehicle. The lack of ground clearance has never been an issue, because if going somewhere I would need more, I just drive a pickup instead. On a narrow twisty road, it is still relaxing to drive at twice the posted corner speeds. Handles like a racing go cart, and basically no body roll.
 
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Electric Chicken

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AWD for slippery surfaces would be nice, my front wheel drive lacks traction sometimes. I do love dropping the backseats, and being able to fit a surprising amount of stuff in my honda hatchback. I'm used to, and enjoy the manual transmission in my car, but it is under powered, and under geared. Lacks strong enough AC for hot days, worst radio reception imaginable in a vehicle. The lack of ground clearance has never been an issue, because if going somewhere I would need more, I just drive a pickup instead. On a narrow twisty road, it is still relaxing to drive at twice the posted corner speeds. Handles like a racing go cart, and basically no body roll.
My Buick is surprisingly planted like that.
 
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mndriver

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The average motorist has no clue about loading and tire pressure. These are the same idiots that want to pull a 6 car trailer with a 3500 series truck, of any brand. Or, Joe on Vacation that loads the crossover SUV to the ceiling with everything but the kitchen sink and has the ass end dragging the ground out camping in the left lane at 70.

Just another reason that I like night driving. No family idiots with overloaded cars, roads are cooler for my own truck and the wear and tear on the truck itself is a lot less. I know, I'm strange. I'm one of those that monitors my gauges. The trans and rears run 10-20 degrees cooler at night. I like to laugh inside at the clown running 80k down the road at 75mph in the blazing sun. A 10psi drop in tire pressure raises that tire temperature about 25 degrees. Prime for a blowout.
Or the weekender pulling that 45’ toyhauler with 18 four wheelers and a pallet of beer with that Ford F-250 superduty single tires.
 
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