Load Checks

freedhardwoods

freedhardwoods
Can someone post a link to the rule on load checks?
 

freedhardwoods

freedhardwoods
Thanks. I was looking on that site and just couldn't find that page for some reason.

Do you (or anyone else) show load checks on your log book? I never have and have never had any dot say anything about it. Now my company wants me to start doing it. I always figured if something is working, why mess with it.
 

Mr. Q

Silent Observer
Thanks. I was looking on that site and just couldn't find that page for some reason.

Do you (or anyone else) show load checks on your log book? I never have and have never had any dot say anything about it. Now my company wants me to start doing it. I always figured If something is working, why mess with it.


It doesn't hurt. The drivers who haul loads on flatbed trailers would definitely have to show that they've performed their cargo checks on their logbooks. There was always the possibility of me getting audited so I never took any chances.

I've never shown a cargo check on my logs when I was hauling freight in a regular dry van trailer. It's kind of hard to check a load when there is a security seal on the trailer's door.
 

truckerdrl

Well-Known Member
your suspose to check your load ( Flatbed ) after the 1st 50 Miles, at a change of Duty Status or @150 miles or after 3 hours which ever comes first. Faliure to do this is counted as a log violations
 

Duck

Sarcastic remark goes here
Screw all that. Close the doors and hammer down. Play "Eastbound and Down" on the stereo at full blast and start ripping through the gears.
 

Racer X 69

Member
Thanks. I was looking on that site and just couldn't find that page for some reason.

Do you (or anyone else) show load checks on your log book? I never have and have never had any dot say anything about it. Now my company wants me to start doing it. I always figured if something is working, why mess with it.

My company recently started emphasizing that we do this.

And I know drivers who have been cited, and placed out of service for not flagging it on their logs.

I just flag it, but don't show any time for it. It takes less than five minutes to do. Sometimes it coincides with a fuel stop or a break for lunch or dinner.

Easy Squeezy.
 

freedhardwoods

freedhardwoods
When the company I was leased to received an unsatisfactory in a DOT audit, They brought in a former Dot cop that was now teaching classes to help companies get compliant. The first thing he said was "I am here to teach you what you can legally do and not do; and it will stand up in court."

One of the things he told us was that it does not specify that you must stop to inspect your load. If you can see it in your mirrors, you can check it going down the road.

your suspose to check your load ( Flatbed ) after the 1st 50 Miles, at a change of Duty Status or @150 miles or after 3 hours which ever comes first. Faliure to do this is counted as a log violations
Can you post a link where it specifically says you have to show something on your logbook if you don't stop?

(I know I'm getting technical, but the cops do it all the time.)
 

DubbleD

Color Commentator
your suspose to check your load ( Flatbed ) after the 1st 50 Miles, at a change of Duty Status or @150 miles or after 3 hours which ever comes first. Faliure to do this is counted as a log violations

...And a 45 minute pre-trip occurs at the beginning of each trip And you are required to double-clutch in school as well.
 

Racer X 69

Member
Can you post a link where it specifically says you have to show something on your logbook if you don't stop?

I know it is in there, trust me, but you have to read it over and over and over. I simply flag it, and like you mention, do a visual with the mirrors.

I use DDL so I simply reach over and make a quick click with the mouse, and enter the location. DDL does the rest.

Easy Squeezy.
 

Racer X 69

Member

That is similar to DDL (what I use), but it costs more and does not have as many features as DDL.

DDL does both Canadian and US rules, allows switch on the fly, and two drivers can share a license. DDL allows free upgrades. DDL has a zillion different layouts, many tailored to specific company requirements.

You can transfer the license to a new computer three times before you have to buy a new license.

You will always know at a glance where you are at with your hours, as DDL keeps track of your time and updates on the fly as the day progresses. It does the math for you so you will never make mistakes or get a ticket for errors.

DDL has features to allow a driver to keep track of all expenses related to the business of trucking. You can generate and print a number of different reports to help run your business if you are an owner operator.

The load and manifest information is carried over from day to day so you don't have to write it down each day while traveling from the shipper to the consignee. (some loads I have had with multiple pick ups and drops gave me writer's cramp writing that stuff down each day when I still used paper logs.)

You enter your mileage each day and it carries over the mileage from the previous day. It then will compute your average miles an hour for the day based on the hours of driving. You even set a maximum miles an hour limit and it will warn you if your daily average exceeds that limit.

I have had many compliments on my logs when reviewed by the Revenue Rangers.

And I get on the list of drivers at my company each month with perfect logs.
 

Racer X 69

Member

Driver's Daily Log.

:thumbsup:

Some kind of e-log or software program? It says "Driver's Daily Log" on my company's paper log books.

(We're on e-logs but we still carry paper logs in case the Qualcomm takes a crap on us)

It is driver's log software that you own, and install on your own laptop.


Thank you Terry. Do you have it yet? You would get lots of benefit from it, plus the cost of the software, the laptop, the printer, paper, ink, etc, is deductible.
 

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