How much do new Truck Drivers with a Class A license make in 2020?

Hello. I’m Nick. I’m new to this group.

What do "you" consider realistic pay for a new Truck Driver just out of school? I have seen some schools stating that they can train you to get a Class A license in 3 - 6 weeks, and offer a starting salary of 50K - 60K a year? Is this realistic/true?

Some trucking companies I see where they will pay about $20 - $25 an hour, and I see some trucking companies that only pay by the mile. What do "you" consider the best pay at this time (in 2020) . . . 50K - 60K a year or $20-$25 per hour or pay by the mile?

You thoughts?
 

GAnthony

Methuselah
Supporter
depends on the company, when you start during that year, how much you run.

on average, about $40,000 your first year.

the best paying jobs..??

that's like asking the best about anything, you're gonna get a zillion answers.
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Hello. I’m Nick. I’m new to this group.

What do "you" consider realistic pay for a new Truck Driver just out of school? I have seen some schools stating that they can train you to get a Class A license in 3 - 6 weeks, and offer a starting salary of 50K - 60K a year? Is this realistic/true?

Some trucking companies I see where they will pay about $20 - $25 an hour, and I see some trucking companies that only pay by the mile. What do "you" consider the best pay at this time (in 2020) . . . 50K - 60K a year or $20-$25 per hour or pay by the mile?

You thoughts?
Salaries.com has some information. I suspect that glassdoor.com might have some pay information. But those sources report averages or other measures of central tendency. In my last year (2013) at Sourdough, most of the guys I drove with were making about $65K. But those who ran Fairbanks-Deadhorse made $100K in that yea without breaking a sweat. Your best source is a driver from a targeted company.
 

vaportrail

Well-Known Member
i think i made 60 my 1st year 6 years later just about 90 with about a month off top guys around here are about 120 local. I dont want to deal with union politics plus a garbage schedule to make those numbers. another raise coming in may. I believe this year im on track for 102 without the raise. I think in 6 years i have probably be over nighted for 15-20 days most of those were optional. then again they dont call me the milk man for nothing :coocoo:dont get me wrong I still run around 130k/year.

Hourly is the way to go I know guys around here doing the same work average about 2 bucks more an hour but they dont get paid to wait to load/unload until 2 hours. some days that can be 3-4-5 hours of waiting depending where your loading out of, much less if the unload pump goes down
 
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ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Salaries.com has some information. I suspect that glassdoor.com might have some pay information. But those sources report averages or other measures of central tendency. In my last year (2013) at Sourdough, most of the guys I drove with were making about $65K. But those who ran Fairbanks-Deadhorse made $100K in that yea without breaking a sweat. Your best source is a driver from a targeted company.
i think i made 60 my 1st year 6 years later just about 90 with about a month off top guys around here are about 120 local. I dont want to deal with union politics plus a garbage schedule to make those numbers. another raise coming in may. I believe this year im on track for 102 without the raise. I think in 6 years i have probably be over nighted for 15-20 days most of those were optional. then again they dont call me the milk man for nothing :coocoo:dont get me wrong I still run around 130k/year.

Hourly is the way to go I know guys around here doing the same work average about 2 bucks more an hour but they dont get paid to wait to load/unload until 2 hours. some days that can be 3-4-5 hours of waiting depending where your loading out of, much less if the unload pump goes down
@Nick Sheridan, keep in mind these two folks are speaking of experienced drivers.

Once you've completed training, you can expect these sort of wages for a full year of employment. Your first year earning training wages will be something less, and that is very dependant on where you land. That first year or two of experience with a clean MVR is what you're aiming for. Then get serious about aiming for a great situation and great money.
 

BlackBart

Shorebilly
Supporter
depends on the company, when you start during that year, how much you run.

on average, about $40,000 your first year.

the best paying jobs..??

that's like asking the best about anything, you're gonna get a zillion answers.
I did about $95K last year.... but he dont wanna work that hard
 

BlackBart

Shorebilly
Supporter
So this guy just got his CDL. How many years experience do you have to pull down 95 large?
About 20.... but he said in another thread he dont wanna load or unload. You want the big bucks you gotta earn it. Aint gonna just fall in his lap

Thats the problem nowadaze. Too many want somethin for nuthin
 
Hello Everyone,

Thank you so very, very much for your help, comments, and suggestions. It is greatly appreciated. What you have shared thus far, has been a learning opportunity for me.

Most of all, I just wanted to get a realistic view of the "real world" vs. those various ads that seem too good to be true. Yet I know that if I asked in this forum, I could get some great and honest feedback. Yet I did want to know a few of the basics, before considering getting my formal training, yet I do know that I will have to successfully work at least 1 to 2 full years, before better jobs and better money will come my way.

Overall, I am not opposed to hard work per se, however I am 56 years old and want one final career before I retire. As an extra "hopeful" benefit of being a Truck Driver, I'm hoping that I will have the opportunity to travel all over the country for at least the next 2 years, while I'm in great health. Currently I have been in the retail industry for almost 10 years, so I have been doing a lot of bending, stooping, standing, walking for years (for my job) . . . to make a little more than minimum wage. Yet now I'm at that age where I don't want to work that hard any longer . . . if I can make around 50K a year as a Truck Driver, then I will be fine and happy.

Thanks again Everyone! :)
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Go buy a camper and work seasonal in the campgrounds.

Better chance of seeing the actual country you want to visit instead of blasting past it
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Overall, I am not opposed to hard work per se, however I am 56 years old and want one final career before I retire. As an extra "hopeful" benefit of being a Truck Driver, I'm hoping that I will have the opportunity to travel all over the country for at least the next 2 years, while I'm in great health. Currently I have been in the retail industry for almost 10 years, so I have been doing a lot of bending, stooping, standing, walking for years (for my job) . . . to make a little more than minimum wage. Yet now I'm at that age where I don't want to work that hard any longer . . . if I can make around 50K a year as a Truck Driver, then I will be fine and happy.
You should have no issues pulling down $50k as an OTR driver, without touching any freight.

In today's world, should be able to stop and see some sites as well, thanks to Uber/Lyft being in many areas at this point.
 

Grumpy Joe

Member
This has also been my question. I too am pushing 60 and getting cdl again
I drove box trucks and dumps even drove a prison bus for 6 years. Now in the midwest itis hard to find any work that pays over 30k a year.

The reality is after 18 to 24months I might make 65 to 95k a year. That is if I fit in with dispatchers and management. A few companies will pay more but they are harder to get in. Then the real wake up is to make this money the home life is gone. One must realize a truck only makes money when the wheels are spinning. Weekly home does not get that often.

My son drives, and soon I will too. Dynasty Truck School has 10 speed trucks for training and final testing. I will throw in as many certs I can, TWICS/TSA/HAZMAT. Then it comes down to old man charm. I can make an elk camp others are jealous of so living inside 100sqft will not be too bad. 6 months with a trainer might be a challenge but the end goal of a bank account will help.

Back in the day it was union or nothing, but few union trucking Jobs are out there for a newbie over 50. Near the ports with a friend or relative union would be easier. Small vs large, for me it is about comfort in the seat. If I am living 10 hours a day the seat has to be good. A small company is less likely to find a seat to rebuild or swap in when I get an old truck driven by some lardaxx.

So I am looking both Springfield and Joplin. It seems to be several good choices here. It will be about timing for a newbie hire. I hope to be behind the wheel with my trainer by May 2020.

Yes I can live out of a single duffle until I get my 50,000 miles. No toys, opinions, complications. The only thing I need at my age is quality TP. DO NOT MESS WITH MY TP.
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
It really depends on your experience level, what you’re hauling and who you drive for.

You’re making a mistake asking how much drivers make, because most (and i mean 99%) drivers will lie. Studies conducted by the ATA have shown that the average nationwide salary is around $40,000.
 

Nomad1

Forum
Supporter
It really depends on your experience level, what you’re hauling and who you drive for.

You’re making a mistake asking how much drivers make, because most (and i mean 99%) drivers will lie. Studies conducted by the ATA have shown that the average nationwide salary is around $40,000.
The problem with that average is that it includes local driver making $15/hr and so called otr driver wanting to be home 3 days a week.
 

Nomad1

Forum
Supporter
I don't see any reason you can't make over $50K a year starting out if you're willing to run. 500 miles a day is not hard to do. You can do that 5 or 6 days most weeks. Just ask different companies what they start you out at.
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
The problem with that average is that it includes local driver making $15/hr and so called otr driver wanting to be home 3 days a week.
That’s exactly what the national AVERAGE means. If I make $20,000 a year and you make $40,000 a year, then the AVERAGE between us is $30,000 a year.
 
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THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
Also, he was referencing in general terms and did not get into specifics, therefore you give a general answer. You don’t get too pedantic by giving exaggerated details the OP didn’t ask for.
 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Springfield or Joplin is mainly Prime Inc country.


@Mike or @ironpony would likely know more carriers from the area.
 

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