Gear advice for new drivers

Hi, I'm writing an article for some trucking magazines and I'm looking for some advice for new drivers. Specifically, what equipment/gear would you advise new truckers to buy for the cab and why? Anything from power inverters to appliances, electronics, clothing etc. What should they bring on the road with them?

Thanks
 

GAnthony

Methuselah
Supporter
Hi, I'm writing an article for some trucking magazines and I'm looking for some advice for new drivers. Specifically, what equipment/gear would you advise new truckers to buy for the cab and why? Anything from power inverters to appliances, electronics, clothing etc. What should they bring on the road with them?

Thanks
frankly this is a good idea you have, but right out of school or other form of training, they will not be making much money right away.

i'd say at the very least, sleeping bag, work boots (steel toed), extra shoes or running shoes to allow one pair to dry out, work clothing (i prefer the Dickies brand), heavy winter coat, maybe thermal underwear.

as far as appliances, some trucks may have a fridge. so a small microwave, maybe a coffee maker, maybe a small cooking top. inverters are best left to the company recommendations and installations. some companies sell those, mine did.

it's really tough to give a complete list, as something always gets forgotten.

it's also a hectic first year for anyone as well. remember too, if they get fired or quit, they must now clean out the truck, and take all that crap either on a bus, train, or plane......unless they quit at the terminal where thier vehicle is parked at.

firings, sometimes takes place, on the spot....millions of miles away from home....
 

Electric Chicken

Well-Known Member
Supporter
frankly this is a good idea you have, but right out of school or other form of training, they will not be making much money right away.

i'd say at the very least, sleeping bag, work boots (steel toed), extra shoes or running shoes to allow one pair to dry out, work clothing (i prefer the Dickies brand), heavy winter coat, maybe thermal underwear.

as far as appliances, some trucks may have a fridge. so a small microwave, maybe a coffee maker, maybe a small cooking top. inverters are best left to the company recommendations and installations. some companies sell those, mine did.

it's really tough to give a complete list, as something always gets forgotten.

it's also a hectic first year for anyone as well. remember too, if they get fired or quit, they must now clean out the truck, and take all that crap either on a bus, train, or plane......unless they quit at the terminal where thier vehicle is parked at.

firings, sometimes takes place, on the spot....millions of miles away from home....
I swear I'm like this crazy anomaly or something. I made I think $1300 my first week on my own.

I agree with the rest. If you have a sleeper that's all good stuff to have. But you probably want to build towards it as needed rather than go on a shopping spree.

I don't have a lot of suggestions since I'm a day cabbie who has no room for those awesome appliances. But I'll recommend a flashlight, zip ties, bungee cords, and side cutters. Side cutters come in handy for those metal band seals. Don't have to tear up your fingers...just snip it off. Bungees for hanging air lines and when your license plate bracket is falling off. Lol



 

mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
Two pairs of leather gloves.

And a pair of rubberized gloves for fueling.

Winter clothes just for the truck. I'm talking bunny boots all the way to a facemask to help you survive -20°F temps in case of a breakdown in the winter.

Yes it happens . I see idjits come north from below the Mason Dixon line and the first time they see subzero temps, they head back and never return.

Mainly because they've never experienced living in a freezer before. Totally foreign concept to them .

I'll echo duct tape and zip ties. I used duct tape to temporarily cover holes in my trailer and sleeper after an accident. At least it got me home two days later. Zip ties to secure anything that should be as well.

Tool and fuel filter for the truck you have. It can save your life.

Two -80oz bottle and a 32 oz bottle of power service diesel 911. One for each fuel tank and the 32 oz for filling your fuel filter. Yes, winter fuel can be a problem today. Again, your life can depend on how you deal with iced over fuel. That can be it's own article.
 

alexwoo

New Member
Many people don't use new technology because it is non traditional or "too difficult" to understand. However, in reality, once learned it really does make the entire process of accepting loads and picking up much easier, especially getting paid on time.
 
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Electric Chicken

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Many people don't use new technology because it is non traditional or "too difficult" to understand. However, in reality, once learned it really does make the entire process of accepting loads and picking up much easier, especially getting paid on time.

When technology goes down and there's no backup plan it's definitely bad BUT these days that's so rare that it's more helpful than harmful.
 
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