Company whose DPFs sparked two fires gets CARB approval

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
A California company’s diesel particulate filters have been blamed for sparking two fires in the last 15 months – but that hasn’t stopped the California Air Resources Board from approving different DPFs made by the company.

San Diego-based Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls has announced the recent approval of its Vista DPF model by CARB and the Environmental Protection Agency. The filter is expected to be used by many trucking companies in order to meet CARB’s On Road Truck and Bus Regulation.

In October, CARB ordered a recall of Cleaire’s LongMile DPF after a truck with a LongMile was blamed for igniting a three-acre brushfire ignited Aug. 4 after the filter failed. The company has agreed to replace all affected LongMile models at no charge to customers by providing either a muffler replacement or a substitute ceramic-like filter, which the company and CARB said is in use on “well over a million other trucks on the road.”

In September 2011, 11 months before the most recent fire, a spark kicked from a big rig and started a 3,600-acre forest fire that destroyed 100 structures and displaced hundreds of rural Washington residents. Washington estimated the fire’s total cost at $5.2 million.

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Duck

Quack
Supporter
This 2010 KW T-660 I'm sitting in has a DPF and behind it is a stupid little muffler known as a "grass burner".

I call it a "driver killer" because you can't do a parked regen without the smoke getting into the cab, as well as any trucks parked beside it.
 

Tazz

Infidel
Rubber Duck said:
This 2010 KW T-660 I'm sitting in has a DPF and behind it is a stupid little muffler known as a "grass burner".

I call it a "driver killer" because you can't do a parked regen without the smoke getting into the cab, as well as any trucks parked beside it.
What is it with people doing parked regens???

I am on my 5th truck with a dpf. Everything from Volvo with a Cummins, Pete with CAT, Pete with Cummins, Pete with PACCAR, Freightshaker with DD13 and never once have I done a parked regen.

Mine always occur running down the highway. Am I doing something wrong( or right)?
 

Injun

Rabid Squaw
Staff member
Supporter
[MENTION=10063]Tazz[/MENTION]: There's nothing wrong with what you're doing and your equipment is. Operating exactly as it should.

When a shop initiates a regen, it's actually called a forced regen. Occasionally, what the system does on its own isn't quite enough to clean the filter completely or something has gone wrong in the system. The first step after reading the codes is to force the DPF to run through a regen cycle even though the computer doesn't think it needs it. It's kinda like taking a clean glass out of the dishwasher and wiping the spots off it.

I suspect that Ruby is being shut off each time she visits the shop. In many cases, this deactivates any codes. The mechanics can't see anything actively wrong, so they force a regen, hoping that the problem is just bits of unburned material. When they finish the regen, the code is gone, so they think they're done. My advice to [MENTION=8832]RACEFAN[/MENTION] is to leave the engine running and ask to have the code read while it's still active. Write down the code number and next time he can get to a Cummins or KW shop, give it to them.



A parked regen happens when the system can't regen on its own because the truck isn't moving fast enough for a log enough period of time, it's just plain too cold out and the system can't get hot enough with the wind chill....or who knows why. The amber idiot light will come steady on, which is the truck requesting a regen at the driver's next convenience. The driver will need to push the little buttonnext time he stops for 45 minutes or so. Usually, he'll get about 200 miles to find a suitable place. If he doesn't, that amber idiot light will start to flash, which means he's got about 15 minutes to initiate the burn. If he still doesn't do it, the red engine light will begin flashing, too. The driver has about a minute to haul it to the shoulder and it's too late to initiate a parked regen. The truck will have to be towed to a service facility. Many companies will charge the driver for the tow in this case.
 

Tazz

Infidel
Thanks [mention] Injun [/mention]thought it was just me or something because I never do it.

Once at Big G the shop did it for some unknown reason, I think it was because the goober was poed I called him out on a wheel seal so he wanted to screw up my idle rate. He lost on both counts and works for Western Express last I heard. I always thought that parked regen was some made up nonsense after that but kept seeing people talking about doing one.
 

Duck

Quack
Supporter
Since I've been driving Kenworth T-660's I haven't had to do any parked (or forced) regens. They do it when the truck is going down the road. I can tell when it's doing it because at light throttle, it'll sound like the jake brake is on, even when the jake switch is off.

With Volvo's, going down the road, about every 400 miles the dash screen will say "regen in progress" for a while. But sometimes it'll give me this little icon with a little cloud-looking thing and I'd have to do a parked regen to make it go off.
 
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