As a Truck Driver, do you have any control over the type of truck you have to drive and the cargo you haul?

Hello. I’m Nick. I’m new to this group.

If you are a new Truck Driver or experienced Truck Driver, I was wondering do you have any control over the type of truck you have to drive and the cargo you haul?
In my case, I know that I do not want to ever haul dangerous cargo and nor do I ever want to have to haul fuel or gravel/dirt. If I can, I want to stick to driving an 18 wheeler truck only.
...
Lastly, I have seen some ads offering “no touch” freight”. Is this common or is this something that happens from time-to-time and or with certain companies?

I could be wrong, but the ideal of driving a 18 wheeler tuck from point “A” to point “B” sounds fun and interesting, but I have no interest in loading or unloading the freight. Yet I did want to find out what is the norm in this industry . . . i.e. is common to “load” and “unload” your own freight?

Thank you in advance for your answers and comments.
 

GAnthony

Methuselah
Supporter
Hello. I’m Nick. I’m new to this group.

If you are a new Truck Driver or experienced Truck Driver, I was wondering do you have any control over the type of truck you have to drive and the cargo you haul?
depends on the company. but as a general company driver, you haul and drive what you are told to do so. if you owned your equipment, THEN you can dictate what you will or will not haul.

In my case, I know that I do not want to ever haul dangerous cargo and nor do I ever want to have to haul fuel or gravel/dirt. If I can, I want to stick to driving an 18 wheeler truck only.
you generally will need the hazmat endorsement with many companies, to haul hazardous cargo, like paint, batteries, cigarette lighters, sometimes aresol(sp?) products. you're not just going to stick to driving.
...
Lastly, I have seen some ads offering “no touch” freight”. Is this common or is this something that happens from time-to-time and or with certain companies?
depends on the company. i work a touch freight load every night, others jobs i have had, were either drop and hook, or the customers loaded or unloaded.

I could be wrong, but the ideal of driving a 18 wheeler tuck from point “A” to point “B” sounds fun and interesting, but I have no interest in loading or unloading the freight. Yet I did want to find out what is the norm in this industry . . . i.e. is common to “load” and “unload” your own freight?

Thank you in advance for your answers and comments.
it is not "fun sounding", it is a job, and a job in which has to be done properly.

i already answered your question on loading/unloading.
 

vaportrail

Well-Known Member
and then the rest of the :TF: sat back in their easy chair looked around and thought to themselves this has got to be a joke

1. you drive what your told to drive most likely a freight shaker or volvo. IE nobody is giving you a hood to start out
2 you go and do what your told to haul
3 doesn't matter if its in a tank,box, open deck, etc its all dangerous (you do know this is one of the most dangerous occupations) right?
4. this is not a game most of the time boring as heck, expect to see the country from the nearest pist lot
5. your gonna be unloading somewhere or dropping and hooking, etc etc etc.

I thing you need to reconsider this, this is not a drive only gig in fact just a small portion is heres some fun facts
ave age of death is 59
profession is riddled with
Heart disease, Diabetes,Hypertension,High cholesterol,Sleep apnea, Lack of physical activity
 

Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Early on, rid yourselves of delusions like "I'm gonna drive a pretty, powerful rig from and to exciting places and traffic will clear a path for me." That means learn to load and unload whatever you are hauling -- you're responsible for it. Further, to the extent possible, learn about the freight that you are hauling. Sooner or later things will go to hell and you'll have to contend with what's in or on your rig. The more you know, the better you can deal with inevitable screw-ups. Briefly, become a trucker as opposed to a steering-wheel-holder.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
Hell yeah! Buy yer truck, and choose yer poison. Other than being an owner operator... you drive what they give you, haul what they tell you to haul where they tell you to go.
 
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mndriver

curmudgeon extraordinare
Supporter
You choose the type of company you work for.

Reefer, dry van etc.

Past that, you take what you get

As an O/O, most companies will give you flexibility on the loads you take.

But will call you on it if you are terribly picky.
 

MJ1657

Bone Head
Supporter
Hello. I’m Nick. I’m new to this group.

If you are a new Truck Driver or experienced Truck Driver, I was wondering do you have any control over the type of truck you have to drive and the cargo you haul?
In my case, I know that I do not want to ever haul dangerous cargo and nor do I ever want to have to haul fuel or gravel/dirt. If I can, I want to stick to driving an 18 wheeler truck only.
...
Lastly, I have seen some ads offering “no touch” freight”. Is this common or is this something that happens from time-to-time and or with certain companies?

I could be wrong, but the ideal of driving a 18 wheeler tuck from point “A” to point “B” sounds fun and interesting, but I have no interest in loading or unloading the freight. Yet I did want to find out what is the norm in this industry . . . i.e. is common to “load” and “unload” your own freight?

Thank you in advance for your answers and comments.
Do what you want to do trucking. Contrary to what most will say you do not need to start out at some bottom feeding mega hauler being marched around the country.

It drives me nuts how so many people on these forums think you need to start out being forced labor. Have a bit of ambition and you can start this career doing what you want to do.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Supporter
It drives me nuts how so many people on these forums think you need to start out being forced labor. Have a bit of ambition and you can start this career doing what you want to do.
It comes down to insurance. Finding a smaller carrier that can insure an inexperienced CDL holder is next to impossible. The larger OTR carriers that do training have the financial wherewithal to self insure themselves... and can deal with the liability that the lack of experience presents.
 
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Fageol

Old acid hauler but not too caustic
Do what you want to do trucking. Contrary to what most will say you do not need to start out at some bottom feeding mega hauler being marched around the country.

It drives me nuts how so many people on these forums think you need to start out being forced labor. Have a bit of ambition and you can start this career doing what you want to do.
For encouragement on your theme, check my post (#6) about Lolly on this thread:
Is there a top 5 or top 10 list of the best trucking companies “to start” with?
 
Hello Everyone,

Thank you once again for sharing your thoughts and wisdom on my newbie questions. The information that you have shared has been most helpful. I think this forum is really great, it is like being in a room full of close friends that have AWESOME answers! I think after I get a few years of experience under my belt, I will look into those “owner, operator” gigs. Yet I’m willing to start from the ground up and learn the craft, and keep my eyes open for the “no touch freight” opportunities. LOL!

GAnthony
, I send you a special thanks, for taking the time to read through my mountain of questions and being so kind and patient to answer them. I so greatly appreciate your help and guidance. :)
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Thinking outside the box, you do somewhat have a choice as to what you will drive. Really not much difference in today's trucks, but take the time to research the trucks operated by potential employers and make that part of your application process.
 

Hunter

Well-Known Member
If you are a new Truck Driver or experienced Truck Driver, I was wondering do you have any control over the type of truck you have to drive and the cargo you haul?
In my case, I know that I do not want to ever haul dangerous cargo and nor do I ever want to have to haul fuel or gravel/dirt. If I can, I want to stick to driving an 18 wheeler truck only.
Well lets say 100% you always have the option to say NO to any driving job or load !
Though do you have a job after that decision ?
Though welcome to the real world you newbie POS (no offense) you're going to do what is needed to be done !

The more dangerous the job is = more $
IMO F the 18 OTR, give me strapping (chains) 28's in blizzards on 10 grades + !
& dealing with 40%H2S.
This is heaven to me, leave me ALONE !
And it gets more entertaining when its snowy/icy that you're dealing with cliffs.
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
Directly, no but indirectly yes. You can chose which company to drive for.

For example I no longer haul general freight and haven’t in almost a year.
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
Also there’s a trade off. Do you want a nice blinged out long nose or do you want to make bread? Because in most instances you can’t have both.
 

BlackBart

Shorebilly
Supporter
Also there’s a trade off. Do you want a nice blinged out long nose or do you want to make bread? Because in most instances you can’t have both.
Why not?

I know some folks with hoods and they do fine. Course they aint pullin boxes tho either
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
Why not?

I know some folks with hoods and they do fine. Course they aint pullin boxes tho either
Doing fine is a vague term like livable wage is. Some would think taking home $1,200 a week is good money whereas others like me would consider that an insult.
 

Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Where ya live will have a bearing on that I think
Very much so.

I considered coming off the road quite some time back. Walmart sent me a quick letter telling me they weren't hiring at the time, and best I could find in regards to local work was $1000/week salary and obviously long hours.

Bought my glider, and then shortly after got contacted again by Walmart asking me to come in to interview. It was a little late at that point.

That said, I'm glad Walmart didn't call me in immediately, because I probably would have taken it and missed out on tons of events with my kids that being my own boss has allowed me to enjoy.
 

THBatMan8

Well-Known Member
Where ya live will have a bearing on that I think
I live in rural Indiana. Low cost of living compared to most of the US. That doesn’t mean I’m going to drive a truck for what I can make operating a forklift.
 

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