Swift drivers or maybe all idk qualcomm

Inkeper

Well-Known Member
When you start your day, you have 14 hours to drive 11 hours. During that 14 hours, if you are on duty for 8 hours, either driving or on duty not driving, you have to take a 30 minute break off duty. That will refresh the rest of your drive time for the 14 hour work/11hour driving time. If you have exhausted your 11 hour drive time, you may not drive again unless you have been off duty or in the sleeper for a combined total of 10 hours.

Remember you do not have to drive all of your 11 hours or work your 14 hours. But you will refresh those hours after your 10 hour break.
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Premium
On-duty and driving hours (line 3 and 4) are recorded as a running total for 8 days. At the end of the 8th day, the hours from the first day drop off. In other words, you get those hours used on the first day back at midnight on the 8th day. These are commonly called "recap hours" from our days under paper logbooks.

You can work a maximum of 70 hours over the course of those 8 days.

Practically, you can work 8.75 hours every day (driving and on-duty,) and never run out of hours.

8.75 hours x 8 days = 70 hours (max)

On the 9th day (after midnight of the 8th day) you have the first 8.75 hour period back to drive. And so on...

If you reach the 70-hour max before you hit the 8th day, you can take advantage of the 34-hour restart rule as mentioned by @Tazz to zero all of your clocks and start over.

You can drive 11 hours every day for 6 days, kill 4 hours on-duty in sundry tasks, and go off-duty (line 1 and 2) for a continuous period of 34-hours. Then you can start over.

You can use the 34-hour rule at any time, and there is no limit to how often you use it. For example, if you get stuck waiting for a load, a little extra standing around can score you a reset as well.

Whether you run on recap hours, or max your drive time and reset is up to you. Often, the choice just happens because of the way the loads work out.

The way electronic logging systems are programmed as required by the FMCSA, if you move the truck before a rest break is up, stop, then continue after the break is complete, you may get yourself in a jam. That motionless period must be a minimum of a full 5-minutes with the tractor parking brake set. Otherwise, the logging system will go back to the end of the stopped period before you first moved the truck, and record all subsequent time on the drive line. That can rob you of a full 10-hour or 30-minute break.

:mad:

Talk about a dirty trick!
 
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bullj21

Well-Known Member
Wow, all of that just to park your truck, I am so happy to be retired, in all of my years of my 44 years of trucking this new electronic log system is just way to much , an oo is going to lose a lot of time and money. It seems those days are about gone?
 

ironpony

Professional Pot-Stirrer
Premium
Wow, all of that just to park your truck, I am so happy to be retired, in all of my years of my 44 years of trucking this new electronic log system is just way to much , an oo is going to lose a lot of time and money. It seems those days are about gone?
Actually not. The HOS hasn't changed very much in the last 10 years, so if one has been logging legally its just a matter of doing the same things with a few adjustments to how you go about operations. The ELD forces absolute compliance to the HOS rules around what happens regarding line 3.

As long as you understand what these systems are doing and how that compliance is implemented by the software, its not a big deal. There's some leeway built into them, and not running afoul of the system limits is the key to getting along with Ms Elogs.

You don't want the beetch ta say, "You are out of hours of service driving time!" with a hundred miles ta go, and a couple of hours to your appointment time. There's no ripping logbook pages out of the binder, and concocting a fable to fit the crime any longer.

If you mean the days of running outlaw in the Monfort lane with a three-digit truck, a stack of comic books and a handful of toothpicks you got from a bull hauler, yep, that's history.
 
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Mike

Well-Known Member
Staff member
If you mean the days of running outlaw in the Monfort lane with a three-digit truck, a stack of comic books and a handful of toothpicks you got from a bull hauler, yep, that's history.
Who the hell is Monfort?

(Said 90% of the drivers out on the road today ;))

My mom actually pulled swinging meat for that outfit. That was a year or so ago though....
 

bullj21

Well-Known Member
Lol, I was the bull hauler for those 44 years. log books were good, the three-digit-truck was good, toothpicks okay at times, cows and bulls even hogs were good. trucking was fun and loved every mile and year I was in trucking. Be safe all out there and Good luck to all.
 

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